Tag Archives: Hong Kong

5 Hidden Cafes in Hong Kong with Great Coffee!

Common Ground

common ground

 

common grounds coffee

Tucked away amidst the busy roads of Shing Wong Street, this rustic cafe is a quiet spot to chill out while escaping the hustle and bustle outside. Once you’re at Shing Wong Street, find the stairway that runs from Caine Road to Hollywood Road and you’ll be able to spot this hidden gem.

Read more on Common Ground here >>

 

Mansons Lot

mansons lot

mansons lot coffee

Named after Sir Mansons, the first to import cattle to Hong Kong to provide fresh milk whom he felt was key to a good cup of coffee, you can expect fresh and delicious coffee concoctions at Mansons Lot. If you’re in Wan Chai, keep an eye out for this unassuming coffee shop along Swatow Street and hop in for a drink.

Read more on Mansons Lot here >>

 

Opendoor Cafe + Courtyard

opendoor

 

opendoor coffee

Next to a high-capacity traffic route opposite Sun Yet Sen Memorial Park, you’ll discover this peaceful haven of a cafe where you can escape the busy roads. Plus, they have a book sharing concept where you can donate or borrow books while you’re there. What better way to spend a lazy afternoon than with a book and a cup of coffee, right?

Read more on Opendoor Cafe + Courtyard here >>

 

The Cupping Room

the cupping room

 

cupping room coffee

When there’s a two-time Hong Kong Barista Championship winner at the helm, you can be sure the coffee at this cafe will be exceptional, from their house blends to single origin espressos. The cosy wooden setting makes this a great spot to relax and hang out with friends as well.

Read more on The Cupping Room here >>

 

Amical

amical

 

amical coffee

This is perhaps the most ‘hidden’ of all these coffee spots. Located above street level along the trendy Star Street Precinct, the only thing you can spot this cafe by is a small overhanging street sign. Other than great coffee, they also boast a variety of latte art (think cute animals and mustache faces) and a beautiful al-fresco balcony to chill out at.

Read more on Amical here >>

 

Visit travelog.me for more information on places to visit when next in Hong Kong.

Images courtesy of (from top to bottom): pinterest.com, yelp.com, goodcoffee.me, cremedelacash.wordpress.com, openrice.com, nofoamplease.com, openrice.com, hkmagazine.com, tripadvisor.com.

10 Festivals to Check Out in Asia This March

If you are spending time in Asia this March, and you’re not quite sure what to do or where to go, you’re in luck. We’ve rounded up the best things to do in Asia in March, so you can arrange your itinerary around festivals, concerts, events and celebrations in the area.

Bali

1. The Bali Spirit Festival

The Bali Spirit Festival is in Ubud, and it’s an annual celebration of dance, yoga, and music. The festival runs over 4 days and 5 nights in the cultural centre of Bali, and will have an interesting mix of both local, indigenous Indonesian culture, and international performances.

balispirit

The festival also includes more than 95 workshops, so you can meet teachers and gurus from a bunch of different fields. This is the place to go if you’re hoping to “find yourself” in Asia, and you’ll be rubbing shoulders with 4,500 other people who are hoping to do the same.

Find more things to do in Bali >>

Vietnam

2. The Perfume Pagoda

theperfumepagodaThe Perfume Pagoda is located about an hour from Hanoi, and the site itself dates back over 2,000 years, to when a Buddhist Monk decided to meditate in the area. The site is now where this religious festival is held, and the festival officially begins on the 15th of February, continuing through the whole month of March.

Expect to see hundreds of thousands of pilgrims making their way to the festival, which is the most famous Buddhist site in Vietnam.

China

3. The Shanghai Peach Blossom Festival

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China has an overwhelming amount of festivals, especially early in the year. The Shanghai Peach Blossom Festival is celebrated from the 26th of March to the 20th of April, and has been running since 1991. Chinese music is played by local ethnic folk musicians, and there are plenty of other entertainment options such as pig races, acrobatics, picnics, and of course the chance to take photos of the gorgeous peach trees-the main draw to the area.

Find more things to do in Shanghai >>

4. The Zigong Lantern FestivalFestive-Chinese-New-Year-Lantern-Design-2015-With-Zigong-Lantern-Festival

The Zigong Lantern Festival is also on, and runs for around a month, from early February to mid-March. The festival has been going strong since the Tang dynasty, and tourists are drawn to the thousands of traditional lanterns made of silk, glass, paper, porcelain, and bamboo.

5. Baiyun Temple Fair

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Visitors to Beijing will want to check out the Baiyun Temple Fair, which runs from mid-February to early March. You’ll get to try plenty of local snacks, browse the folk handicrafts, and enjoy the painting exhibitions. This is an important fair for Taoists, and has become increasingly popular with locals, who play games and watch the Peking opera, dragon dancing, kung fu shows, and stilt walking.

Find more things to do in Beijing >>

Hong Kong

6. Hong Kong International Film Festival

00221917dec40ed68f1c07If you’re stopping over in Hong Kong in late March, be sure to check out the Hong Kong International Film Festival. The festival is also a big deal to the Chinese, who have the opportunity to show films that they wouldn’t be able to show in China.

7. The Hong Kong Arts Festival

HKAF 2012 2 The Hong Kong Arts Festival also runs throughout March, and includes numerous performances from China and overseas, including ballets, operas, and symphonies.

See more things to do in Hong Kong >>

Thailand

8. Pattaya Music Festival

PATTAYA-INTERNATIONAL-MUSIC-FESTIVAL01If you’ll be down south, be sure to head to Pattaya for the Pattaya Music Festival, which will feature every type of music that is at the front of the Thai Industry. Music fans will love this festival, and Pattaya gets crazy at the best of times.

9. The Bangkok International Jazz Festival

7eee4ecb6595160eaaad14e90adf3The Bangkok International Jazz Festival also draws jazz lovers from around the world, and you’ll usually find it in CentralWorld Square, over six days. Enjoy world-class artists, and take some time to do some shopping in the city while you’re there.

Find more things to do in Bangkok >>

India

10. Holi Festival

Holi-Images-Holi-Celebration-Holi-Festival-Of-Colors-Holi-Colors-Holi-Colours-Free-Images-3During the full moon in March, Holi is the festival of colours, and is when both children and adults welcome Spring by throwing coloured powder at each other. Dyed water is also thrown from buckets, shot from syringes, and poured into balloons and tossed at people.


Article contributed by Stacey Kuyf, onetravelsfar.com.

Visit travelog.me for more information on things to do when living or traveling in Asia.

Need more information to help you find the best things do this  month in Asia?

Images courtesy of (from top to bottom) Festivals of Colour USAUltimate Bali, Event-Carnival, Travel Chinesecio, Jenniferrana.comBeijing Tourism, China Daily, PR Web, All About Jazz, Wikipedia.

Top Places to Party During The Hong Kong Sevens

This year, The Hong Kong Sevens are held on the last weekend of March, 27 – 29 March, at the Hong Kong Stadium. Once again, the city is bracing itself for an influx of tourists from all over the world. 28 teams will be participating in the 2015 tournament, and  here are some tips on where to party (and how to survive) the Hong Kong Sevens weekend.

Hong-Kong-Sevens-2015
Hong Kong Stadium

While the South Stand is hard to get into, this is the place to be if you want to party throughout the Sevens. It’ll be loud, colourful, and crazy, and you’ll see plenty of awesome costumes so be sure to dress up. The seating is unreserved, so try to get here early to grab a seat.

The Sevens will usually finish between 7 and 9, so you’ll have plenty of time to explore Hong Kong by night.

Here are some of the best places to party:

Wan Chai

Wan Chai used to be Hong Kong’s red light district in Hong Kong and these days is bursting with all sorts of pubs and bars, which overflow onto the streets.

wan chai
Wan Chai

This area is close to the stadium, and the streets are sure to be packed with people still in their costumes. This is where you’ll find the cheapest drinks in Hong Kong, and a lot of character which makes Wan Chai an interesting and exciting place to explore.

Take the outdoor public escalator to the top of the district, and pinball your way down, hitting the best bars.

The most boisterous and busiest parts of Wan Chai are “The Corners,” which are two intersections on Lockhart Road, one by Fenwick Street, and the other at Luard Road. These are where you’ll find the less sleazy bars, and it’s the place to go for a slightly more upscale drinking experience.

Mes Amis
Mes Amis

Mes Amis is an open facaded bar, and is usually considered to be the centre of Wan Chai. The central location is on the corner of Luard and Lockhart, and it’s a good place to meet friends, with crowds spilling out onto the streets. Walk a little further up Luard Road until you get to Jaffe Road, and you’ll find the Delaney’s The Irish Pub as well as Bar Amazonia, both popular choices in this area.

Delaney's Irish Pub
Delaney’s Irish Pub

See more on Mes Amis, Delaney’s and Bar Amazonia.

While the Fenwick-Lockhart junction isn’t quite as central as the Luard-Lockhart corner, the nautically-themed Typhoon is a must-visit, and is famous for giving out free shots whenever there is a Typhoon warning. Typhoon is a place that gets crazy during the Seven’s and is known as one of the best places to party.

Typhoon
Typhoon

When the booze hits, and you’re ready to dance, head to Carnegie’s, which has installed brass railings on the bar since dancing on top of it is so popular. This place generally draws a younger crowd with a mix of tourists, university students, and international school kids frequenting it regularly. It’s sure to be a huge hit during the Seven’s.

See more on Carnegie’s >>

Read more about Wan Chai here >>

Carnegie’s

Lan Kwai Fong

Lan Kwai Fong is one of the other main drinking districts in Hong Kong, and the bars here are some of the best in Asia, which has earned it the nickname of party central. It’s not as close to the Hong Kong Stadium as Wan Chai, but the area is still well worth a visit.

Dublin Jacks is an Irish bar, with a friendly atmosphere and a great deck to chill out on, and Irish pub-style food. Grab a bite to eat here, before heading to The Hong Kong Brew House for the best selection of beers in Hong Kong.

See more on The Hong Kong Brew House >>

Hong Kong Brew House
Hong Kong Brew House

When it’s time to really party, head to Stormies (LKF), which is where hundreds of people inevitably end up spilling out into the street. There’s a surprisingly good restaurant upstairs, serving excellent seafood.

 See more on Stormies (LKF) >>

stormies-lkf-3

For something a little different, head to Sub Zero Temp Bar, a Russian restaurant, where patrons can hang out in the freezer and drink multiple types of vodka. Don’t worry about being underdressed, as they have plenty of fur coats for you to wear.

The Seven’s is a great excuse to go out, and with the amount of amazing bars and clubs on offer in Hong Kong, you’ll be spoiled for choice when you go out after the games.

Discover more about Lan Kwai Fong >>

Lan Kwai Fong
Lan Kwai Fong

 See more on Hong Kong nightlife here >>


Article contributed by Stacey Kuyf, onetravelsfar.com.

Visit travelog.me for more information on planning a trip to Hong Kong.

Need more information to help you plan for your trip to Hong Kong? Check out these useful links for more ideas:

Images courtesy of (from top to bottom) Events.com.au, Romainjl.deviantart.com, The Creative Bull, Asia BarsMad Buzz HK, Blogs.wsj.com, Asia Pub Guide, VenueHub.hk.

Best Places in Asia For Celebrating Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year is just round the corner so here at Travelog we’ve come up with a list of the eight cities across Asia where you can best see the festivities and experience a century old tradition come alive in modern settings!

Beijing-CNY

1.  Beijing, China

Beijing is where the biggest of all Chinese New Year celebrations take place across the world. With thousands of years of tradition waiting to come alive during this period, Beijing holds one of the world’s most colourful and interesting celebrations. Many temple fairs are set up during this festive period which showcases martial arts demonstrations, lion dances, folk performances. There will also be special sales and loads of festival food. Most people spend this period spending time with their families and visiting temples to pray to the gods. However, as it is after all China’s biggest public holiday, you can be sure that Beijing’s Chinese New Year celebrations will not be disappointing. Oh, and be prepared for an endless array of fireworks!

Find out more >>

Penang Malaysia

2.  Penang, Malaysia

Penang, particularly George Town, is where the festivities begin. Listed as one of the UNESCO heritage sites in Southeast Asia, George Town literally lights up during CNY. With lanterns hanging all over, a warm reddish-orange glow floods the streets as people celebrate with performances, delicious food and happy smiles! The renowned Kek Lok Si Temple would probably be the biggest light source in the area as it often lights thousands of lanterns and bulbs, illuminating the century old temple in preparation of the festivities.

Shanghai

3.  Shanghai, China

Shanghai, just like Beijing, will see tons of people flocking the streets of this Chinese city. However, unlike Beijing, Shanghai has its own charm and unique character. The Longhua Temple, the oldest in Shanghai, will see 108 Buddhist monks invited to climb the pagoda to strike the bell as a symbolic welcome of the new year while chasing away evil spirits. The Yu Yuan Gardens holds the city’s most famous lantern show – locals dress up in traditional garb and walk around the gardens holding ornately decorated lanterns as they revel in the festivities with delicious food and interesting merchandises that are for sale. To catch spectacular fireworks, head to The Bund which also has many party spots for you and your friends to get a drink and unwind.

Find out more >>

Hong Kong

4.  Hong Kong, China

With a full 15 days to celebrate age old traditions and cultural festivities, Hong Kong is no stranger to the Chinese New Year get up. Locals will flock to temples around the city to pray for good fortune in the new year, as do most places. However, in Hong Kong, the holiday kicks off with a fabulous parade along Tsim Sha Tsui with dozens of floats and performing groups. Fireworks are a definite must as well and you can catch the spectacular display of pyrotechnics along Victoria Harbour. And to make the holiday even more exciting, promotions, discounts and sales pop up all over giving locals to tourists alike, a wonderful shopping spree to stock up on new clothes for the new year.

See more >>

Bangkok

5.  Bangkok, Thailand

Home to the largest population of Chinese in Thailand, Bangkok naturally holds one of the biggest Chinese New Year celebrations in the country. Being predominantly Buddhist, most of the Chinese would take a day off to visit temples and give offerings in hope of a blessed year ahead. From red lanterns strung across streets, to loud music and lion dances as well as street performers, Bangkok is bustling more than ever during this period. Not to forget rows of stalls selling a variety of street food that will provide much needed relief as you’re out immersing yourself in the festivities. Do check out Nakhon Sawan, 220 km north of Bangkok as they have one of the grandest celebrations. One of the highlights would be the acrobatic performers who climb a 10m pole to retrieve the money affixed at the top!

Learn more >>

Singapore

6.  Singapore

Singapore’s official colours may be red and white but during CNY, red and gold is strewn across the streets especially in Chinatown where huge statues and pretty lanterns line the roads. Although fireworks are not so common during CNY as compared to other countries in Asia, the Singaporeans still have a good time during this season. From lion dances to street bazaars and acrobatic carnivals and shows, there’s plenty to keep everyone entertained. Not to mention all the delectable Chinese New Year goodies which are only available during this period. As Singapore is celebrating it’s 50th anniversary this year, Chinese New Year will lead up to one of the grandest parades ever to be held – Chingay 2015, themed “We Love SG”, so if you’re in town for CNY be sure to extend your stay to catch it!

Find out more here >>

Taiwan

7.  Taiwan

When we think of Chinese New Year in Taiwan, we think of lanterns, lanterns, lanterns. They vary vastly in shape and size and patterns but all bring joy and light to the people of Taiwan and its visitors. The culmination of celebrations ends with the biggest lantern festival where paper lanterns are lit and released en masse into the skies. People often write their wishes on the paper lanterns and send them up towards the heavens in hope of them coming true. The best place to catch the lantern festival would be in Pingxi. The sight of all the lanterns being released at once is truly one to behold.

Ho Chi Minh

8.  Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam

Considered one of the most important celebrations of the year, Chinese New Year or Tet as it’s called in Vietnamese is one of the most celebrated festivities. Tet is well known for its gorgeous flower displays where they would be arranged in the likeness of the animal that represents the coming year. A good place to catch the flower displays would be Nguyen Hue Flower Street. If you’re not so into flora, try the entertainment parts such as Dam Sen Park or Sui Tien Park. With music shows, games and activities, these parks transform into a mini carnival of sorts for everyone to revel in the festive spirit. Ho Chi Minh definitely comes alive during Tet with multiple performances along the streets, flowers blooming and lots of activities for one and all to take part in.

Still not sure where to celebrate this year’s Chinese New Year?  


Images courtesy of (from top to bottom) CPCSSchoolsWonderful MalaysiaShanghai HighlightsHK MagazineWikalendaContinental People10kBlessingsFengshui and VoyagestoAntiquity.

Still not sure where to celebrate Chinese New Year in Asia this year? Check out these useful links for more ideas:

The Essential Guide to Celebrating Chinese New Year in Hong Kong in 2015

Chinese New Year this year begins on February 19, and what better place to experience it than in Hong Kong? Chinese New Year is a huge celebration of food, festivities and Chinese culture across Chinese countries and cities. Hong Kong has it all, from the bursts of colour in the streets to delicious Chinese New Year goodies begging to be eaten. Join in on their annual Chinese New Year street parade, the dazzling display of fireworks and the raucous nightlife that is sure to keep the festive buzz going for the traditional 15 days of celebration. Street markets, banks, public utilities and government offices will be closed from February 19 to 21, but everything else is open for the revelers in Hong Kong. Who said that the city shuts down during the Lunar Festival? In Hong Kong, Chinese New Year is when the party begins.

1) 19th February : Tsim Sha Tsui, Chinese New Year Parade on 1 cny parade

Position yourselves early along Nathan Road, Canton Road or Haiphong Road for a prime view of the annual Chinese New Year Parade. It’s a glorious mess of floats, lion dancing and even pyrotechnics, traversing down the usually traffic-laden road of Tsim Sha Tsui. Plunge right into the crowd and join in on the revelry!

Click here for more information on Tsim Sha Tsui >>

2)  20th February : Victoria Harbour, Chinese New Year Fireworks Display
2 fireworks

Very much like their New Year’s Eve fireworks display but just as opulent and astounding, if not more. Join the merrymakers along the sides of Victoria Harbour and prepare to be amazed by the fireworks, guaranteed to add a bang to the already-exhilarating celebrations. The dazzling show starts at 8:00 p.m. but as always, go early to secure the best view!

Get more information about Victoria Harbour here >>

3) Disneyland
3 disneyland

If you fancy a move away from the hustle and bustle of the city for the day, pay a visit to the Chinese New Year themed Disneyland! You may very well meet the same excited faces that you met at the parade or the fireworks display, but only in Hong Kong Disneyland will you see the iconic Disney festooned in the traditional burst of red and gold. Grab a pair of Mouse Ears and spend a day celebrating a different sort of Chinese New Year. With one-of-a-kind Chinese New Year-themed food and souvenirs, remember to drop by if you want a unique Disneyland experience.

Click here for more information on Hong Kong Disneyland >>

4) 5th March : Lantern Festival
4 lantern festival

The Lantern Festival marks the end of the Chinese New Year festivities, but rest assured the same amount of effort has been put into this festival to make sure the celebrations end off with a bang! Happening on the 15th day of Chinese New Year, Tsim Sha Tsui will be adorned with lanterns of all shapes and sizes, adding even more light and colour to the already-vibrant Hong Kong. Head to the Hong Kong Cultural Centre Piazza for the Lantern Exhibition, where you can admire the myriad lanterns for free. Also at the Cultural Centre is a lantern carnival, where lively performances by folk dancers and acrobatic performances are the order of the day.

Learn more about Hong Kong Cultural Centre here >>

5)  Party at Lan Kwai Fong or Wan Chai 5 lankwaifong

For the night owls, the party hubs at Lan Kwai Fong and Wan Chai are sure to tickle your fancy. There are a variety of bars and clubs to suit your preferences, be it a wild night out partying or a relaxed sit-down with your friends. Just remember to keep that hangover in check for more celebrating the next day!

Still not sure what to do when visiting Hong Kong for this year’s Chinese New Year?  Check out Travelog for more useful, up-to-date information on things to do and places to visit in Hong Kong.

Click here >> 


Images courtesy of (from top to bottom) Discover Hong Kong (1 and 5), New Years Eve Blog (2 and 4), Hong Kong Disneyland.

Still not sure where to celebrate Chinese New Year in Hong Kong in 2015? Check out these useful links for more ideas:

Celebrating New Year’s Eve in Hong Kong

The New Year Celebrations in Hong Kong are an extravagant affair and display a good mix of Chinese and Western culture in their celebrations.  Start off your night with the ball drop in Causeway Bay before heading down to the Victoria Harbor for the breathtaking New Year Firework and Symphony of Lights show and finishing off at Lan Kwai Fong for a good time with your loved ones. For those who prefer to avoid the crowds, catch the New Year’s Eve Countdown Carnival that would be broadcasted all over Hong Kong. Hang out with locals and celebrate with the Lion and Dragon Dance Parade the next day. We are sure that you’ll find something amazing to commemorate 2014 and welcome 2015 in Hong Kong!

1.  New Year Fireworks & Symphony of Lights Show

new year fireworks

Hop on to any cruise at the Victoria Harbor for a spectacular time with a sumptuous dinner, fascinating lights and lovely company. The Symphony of Lights show is a unique visual performance that attracts thousands of visitors every day, and on the last 20 seconds of 31st December 2014, there would be breathtaking fireworks to boot. If you do not wish to cruise down the river and prefer to remain on land for the celebration, the viewing deck on the Victoria Harbor is a pleasant place for a great view of the light show and fireworks.

Learn more about Victoria Harbor >>

2.  New Year’s Eve Countdown Carnival

hong kong countdown carnival

An annual affair, Hong Kong’s countdown carnival is watched by many families at home or those with a New Year’s Eve house party. The large scale countdown event is from 8.30pm on the 31st to 12.15am and features many stellar performances by many different artistes. It is held in several different locations, namely Sha Tin Park, Sha Tin Town Hall cum City Art Square. If you’re not satisfied with just watching the countdown carnival from a tiny black box at home, do join in the festivities at the various locations across Hong Kong. The carnival promises plenty of fun and excitement to welcome the New Year.

3.  Ball Drop in Causeway Bay

ball drop in causeway bay

The New Year celebrations in Hong Kong begin with the Ball Drop in Times Square Mall at Causeway Bay. A replica of the New York ball drop, the promising Hong Kong version is fantastic as well. The buzzing energy from the crowd, the crazy lights in Causeway Bay and the general atmosphere makes one expectant of the New Year. Before you head off for the other festivities in Hong Kong, one definitely has to come to witness the ball drop at ‘Times Square’.

Find out more about Times Square Mall >>

4.  Lan Kwai Fong

lan kwai fong

How else to celebrate the coming of the year other than with some close friends and mugs of beer? Enjoy the festivities in over 100 F&B outlets all over Lan Kwai Fong and celebrate the New Year with traditional fireworks (get a seat outside for a better view!) and a countdown you’re your loved ones. Please don’t be startled by the presence of police and security officers all over the place, it’s just an indicator of the huge buzzing crowd that’s going to gather to celebrate the night.

Learn more about Lan Kwai Fong >>

5.  Lion and Dragon Dance Parade

lion and dragon dance parade

The New Year celebrations we have mentioned so far are typical New Year festivities that can be found all over the world and takes place on the 31st of December. However, for those who prefer a localized celebration on the first day of the New Year, do check out the Lion and Dragon Dance Parade that starts from Canton Road along Hong Kong Cultural Centre and finishes at UC Centenary Garden, East Tsim Sha Tsui. The event starts at 1.30pm but do head down earlier for a better view of the parade.

Find out more about Hong Kong Cultural Centre >>

Still not sure what to do when visiting Hong Kong this New Year’s?

Check out Travelog  for more useful, up-to-date information on things to do and places to visit in Singapore.

Click here >> 


Images courtesy of (from top to bottom) Traveling with Annie and Blue, Huffington Post, The Next Web, Wikimedia Commons, Sassy Hong Kong.

Still not sure what to do for New Year’s Eve in Hong Kong? Check out these useful links for more ideas:

 

 

Where to Enjoy the Festive Season in Hong Kong

If you happen to be in Hong Kong during Christmas, you will not be disappointed. The Travelog team have selected the top events for celebrating this special day with your friends and families. Be prepared to have tons of fun and to takeaway loads of memories.

1.  Hong Kong Disneyland

1

There is nowhere else to spend your Christmas other than in the most magical place on Earth – Disneyland. This year, Hong Kong Disneyland will be celebrating the festival with the theme ‘Frozen’.  Popular Disney characters Queen Elsa and Princess Anna will be making their appearances. There would also be the usual light show and Disney parade that we guarantee will make this Christmas one that will leave you reminiscing for years.  Don’t forget to grab some last-minute Christmas shopping from the Disney store for your family and friends.

Click here for more on Hong Kong Disneyland >>

2. International Commerce Centre Light and Music Show

icc light and music show

For the month of December, the International Commerce Centre (ICC) Light and Music show would be displayed on the tallest building in Hong Kong. The theme for the show this year is ‘Spreading Love in a Winter’ where a Love Train will make its way through the North and South Poles to meet Polar Bears and Penguins for a smashing adventure in the snow. On Christmas day itself, the ICC would also be featuring countdown illuminations. The best viewing place would be the outdoor terraces of the IFC Mall.

Click here for more information about IFC Mall >>

3.  Ngong Ping 360

ngong ping 360

Located on Lantau Island, the festivities at the culturally themed Ngong Ping village will be one of a kind. Start off your journey from the Hong Kong Island with a cable car ride that offers a magnificent view of parks, the bay and even the airport. Wander through a great range of dining, shopping and entertainment outlets, all Christmas decorated and ready to heartily welcome guests for this special day. This year, you can also watch the winners of the inaugural ‘Ngong Ping 360’s Got Talent’ show off their skills on the grand outdoor stage. Do visit the typical tourist attractions on Lantau Island while you’re here as well.

Learn more about Ngong Ping here >>

4. Hong Kong Ballet Show

hong kong ballet show

For those who prefer to spend their Christmas with fine opera and dance, head down to the Hong Kong Cultural Centre where ‘The Nutcracker’ would be performed live by the Hong Kong Sinfonietta. Guest artists, Aki Saito from Japan and Dmitry Semionov from Russia will also be participating in the performance. This is a show suitable for families where the famous Christmas story comes alive.

More about Hong Kong Cultural Centre >>

5. Hong Kong Malls

hong kong malls

To look for the best Christmas decorations in Hong Kong, you have to do a mall-hop to check out the various themed decorations. The malls treat Christmas with utmost importance and the decorations are detailed and amazing. Also, during Christmas eve and Christmas, groups of carollers from churches and schools would be making their rounds around the malls in Hong Kong to perform.  This is the best local Christmas fun you can get in Hong Kong and we highly recommend you to just check out a couple of malls and look out for performances by the carollers.

Malls we recommend:

  1. Langham Place Mall, 8 Argyle Street, Mong Kok, Kowloon
  2. 1881 Heritage, 2A Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
  3. New Town Plaza, 18 Sha Tin Centre St, Sha Tin, New Territories
  4. Harbor City, 7-27 Canton Rd, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon
  5. The Landmark, 15 Queen’s Road Central, Central, Hong Kong Island

Check out our article on ‘Hong Kong’s Top 10 Shopping Malls‘ for more information on Shopping in Hong Kong, click here >>


 

Still not sure what to do when visiting Hong Kong this Christmas?

Check out Travelog for more useful, up-to-date information on things to do and places to visit in Hong Kong.

Click here >> 


Images courtesy of (from top to bottom) China International Travel Service, Sun Hung Kai Properties, SimpleDreamer.com, Hong Kong Ballet, Want China Times.

Still not sure what to do for Christmas in Hong Kong? Check out these useful links for more ideas: